About InlandLinks

About sustainability

Sustainable business practices are becoming increasingly important. There is a growing need for insight into the impact logistics operations have on the environment. InlandLinks makes the CO2 emissions of the affiliated inland terminals transparent and shows what the terminals are doing to reduce CO2. On this page, you will find an explanation of the results from the inland terminals as presented and the intermodal route planner.

 

CO2 emissions per container at the inland terminal

An inland terminal is a transfer point between different modes of transport. Handling containers requires the deployment of manpower and resources and results in CO2 emissions. On the page for a particular inland terminal, you will find the average CO2 emission for a container for the terminal in question. The CO2 emission is calculated by dividing the total annual energy consumption (consumption of diesel, electricity and gas and the accompanying CO2 emission) of the inland terminal by the total number of containers handled. The energy consumption is derived from the terminal’s records (for example on the basis of energy bills). Then, the CO2 emissions are calculated per type of energy. The emission factors used here to calculate the total CO2 emissions are as follows (source:http://co2emissiefactoren.nl/):

  • Diesel: 3.240 kg CO2 per litre 
  • Natural gas:1.884 kg CO2 per m3
  • Propane: 1.725 kg CO2 per litre
  • CNG: 2.728 kg CO2 per kg
  • LNG: 3.370 kg CO2 per kg
  • LPG:1.900 kg CO2 per liter
  • Grey energy: 0.455 kg CO2 per KWH 
  • Energy based on biomass: 0.189 kg CO2 per KWH
  • Green energy (based on wind/water): 0.000 kg CO2 per KWH 
  • Green energy (solar): 0.000 kg CO2 per KWH

 

The total includes the energy consumption of offices and warehouses. The energy consumption of terminal tractors is not included, because this concerns pre-transport or post-transport. The emission factors used include the emissions from extracting raw materials and fuels right up to combustion (the so-called well-to-wheels principle). Emission factors can differ from country to country. InlandLinks applies the above emission factors to all inland terminals, so that it is easier to compare the terminals with each other.

 

CO2 emission saving route planner

In addition to the available connections, the InlandLinks route planner also presents a CO2 emission saving per connection. This emission saving is given relative to transport by road. The saving is based on CE-Delft’s STREAM model. In this model, the emissions, including CO2, from international goods transport are calculated on the basis of different variables, such as mode of transport, distance, type of fuel and route. The STREAM model makes use of data that is widely accepted by scientists, business and government.

 

The calculation is based on an average weight of 15 tonnes per container (incl. container). Averages are used with both inland shipping and road transport for the type of inland vessel and truck. On average, an inland vessel emits 31 grams of CO2 per tonne kilometre, which results in an emission factor of 0.465 kg of CO2 per container kilometre used. A diesel train emits an average 29 grams of CO2 per tonne kilometre (0.435 kg CO2 per container kilometre). A truck emits an average 62 grams of CO2 per tonne kilometre (0.930 kg/container kilometre).

 

Organisational efforts to reduce CO2

In addition to the inland terminal’s CO2 emissions, insight is provided into the organisational measures which the inland terminal has introduced to reduce emissions. InlandLinks has worked out various levels (0-4) per component, with the lowest level (0) signifying that no measures have been taken to reduce CO2 and the highest level (4) signifying that all possible measures have been taken to reduce emissions. Below you will find the different levels defined per component.

 

Monitoring fuel usage

Level 0: The fuel saving (manage on the use of number of liters) has not been registered.

Level 1: Fuel saving will be registered at organizational level.

Level 2: Fuel saving will be registered at organizational level and on individual driver and truck level.

Level 3: Fuel saving will be registered at organizational level and on individual driver and truck level. There is a culture in which these individual results are shared and rewarded (rankings, recognition, reward).

Level 4: The organization has drawn an energy management system / program (according to ISO 50001 or equivalent in nature). The objectives of this program will be measured and monitored, focus is on continuous improvement of energy efficiency. Internal and external communication takes place about this program.

 

Efficient use of equipment

Level 0: No training for employees on moving equipment (reach, terminal stacker, crane, truck).

Level 1: Drivers are given a general training but no training specific on fuel reduction (manage on the use of number of liters).

Level 2: Drivers receive a one-time training focused on fuel saving (manage on the use of number of liters). Energy in buildings (sheds, warehouse and offices) is reduced by light / timers on equipment.

Level 3: Drivers receive a one-time training focused on fuel saving (manage on the use of number of liters) (When a new vehicle is purchased, a sequel/new training is provided).  Energy in buildings (sheds, warehouse and offices) is reduced by light / timers on equipment.

Level 4: The organization has drawn an energy management system / program (according to ISO 50001 or equivalent in nature). The objectives of this program will be measured and monitored, focus is on continuous improvement of energy efficiency. Internal and external communication takes place about this program.

 

Efficient operation

Level 0: The container stacking planning is done manually. There is no system in place (Excel is no system).

Level 1: The container stacking planning takes place by means of a manual system in which the position of the container is determined.

Level 2: The container stacking planning takes place by means of a automatic location system. The number of movements is measured and the number of movements is managed to keep them as low as possible.

Level 3: The container stacking planning takes place by means of a automatic location system, in which the system determines the position. The number of container movements are measured by the system and will be reduced to a minimum.

Level 4:  There is an automated location planning system in place which is aimed at minimizing the empty crane movements. Load and offload movements are combined with storage/location switching of containers movements.

 

Communication

Level 0: The organization does not communicate about sustainability.

Level 1: The organization communicates internally about their sustainability policy and initiatives.

Level 2: The organization communicates internally and externally about their sustainability policy and initiatives.

Level 3: The organization communicates internally and externally about their sustainability policy and initiatives. The organization has drawn sustainability KPI's* and accounts internally and externally on these KPI's."

Level 4: The organization communicates internally and externally about their sustainability policy and initiatives. The organization publishes, with a minimum of once a year, an external verified sustainability report in accordance to the standards of the GRI (Global Reporting Initiative)."

 

Innovation

Level 0: The organization does not invest in sustainability initiatives. There will be no attention given to sustainable initiatives in the market when making replacement investments.

Level 1: There is a policy with respect to (replacement) investments. When replacing, there will be chosen for a product which is demonstrably more economical than the product the organization is replacing.

Level 2: The organization invest (investment in hours of work) in developments, innovations and initiatives in the field of sustainability.

Level 3: The organization invest (investment in hours of work and money) in developments, innovations and initiatives in the field of sustainability.

Level 4: The organizations’ goal is to operate Co2 neutral within 20 years. A policy to accomplish this goal is extant. The organization invest (investment in hours of work and money) in developments, innovations and initiatives in the field of sustainability. (Time horizon of the investment maybe multiple years and can also be allocated to years in which no investments are made)

 

Supply chain collaboration

Level 0: The organization is not aware of sector or chain initiatives in the area of ​​sustainability.

Level 1: The organization is aware of sector or chain initiatives projects with the primary aim of reducing Co2 emissions.

Level 2: The organization participates in at least one Co2 emission reduction initiative in the chain / sector.

Level 3: The organization collaborates with a supplier, customer and / or other parties in order to reduce the Co2 emissions in the chain.

Level 4: The organization develops a industry, along with several parties in the chain, first-in-class initiative / innovative project aimed at Co2 emission reduction or adaptation of new technologies aimed at Co2 emission reduction.

 

Sources 

The above is based on the CO2 performance ladder of the Dutch Independent Foundation for Climate Friendly Procurement and Business (SKAO) (http://www.skao.nl/) and was modified to meet the specific commercial situation of an inland terminal in collaboration with Connekt, and checked against the latest update from the Climate Neutral Group (http://climateneutralgroup.com)